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Enjoying Semi-Retirement by Keeping Up With the Kids Online.

Wildlife Book Club meeting

Event Date: 
Tuesday, December 5, 2017 – 19:00

from Wildlife Center of Virginia RSS https://www.wildlifecenter.org/news_events/events/wildlife-book-club-meeting-17
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Slight cool-down possible, particularly under $250,000

The red-hot Twin Cities housing market is starting to cool off just a bit. While June 2017 marked an all-time record for Twin Cities home sales and prices, purchase demand declined from last year for a third consecutive month. New listings decreased 5.2 percent from September 2016 to 6,472, and pending sales dipped 1.7 percent. The number of homes for sale decreased 16.7 percent to 12,502. Excluding the limited number of foreclosures and short sales, traditional new listings fell 3.6 percent while traditional pending sales increased 0.1 percent.

Since competition over limited supply remains intense, prices kept firm. The median sales price rose 7.3 percent from last year to $246,900. Home prices have now risen for the last 67 consecutive months or over 5.5 years. At 50 days on average, homes went under contract 12.3 percent faster than last September. Sellers who choose to list their properties are averaging 98.1 percent of their original list price, 0.6 percent higher than September 2016. The metro area has just 2.5 months of housing supply. Generally, five to six months of supply is considered a balanced market where neither buyers nor sellers have a clear advantage.
 
“There’s no other way to say it: sentiment out there may be starting to change,” said Cotty Lowry, Minneapolis Area Association of REALTORS® (MAAR) President. “Sometimes shifting markets can bring out a lot of pessimism, which can become a self-fulfilling prophecy. The likely scenario may be a brief pause in the trend we’ve seen. That’s not a bad thing, since it allows incomes a chance to catch up and takes the intensity down a notch.”Sometimes market-wide figures mask important segment-specific realities and other indicators that buyers and sellers should be aware of. For example, closed sales only fell for homes under $250,000. Sales increased for homes priced between $250,000 and $500,000, $500,000 and $1,000,000 and for properties over $1,000,000. Market times and the ratio of sales price to list price both improved for each of the above four price ranges.

The most recent national unemployment rate is 4.4 percent, though it’s 3.4 percent locally—the third lowest unemployment rate of any major metro area. A thriving and diverse economy has been conducive to housing recovery, as job and wage growth are key to new household formations and housing demand. The Minneapolis–St. Paul region has a resilient economy with a global reach, a talented workforce, top-notch schools, exposure to the growing technology and healthcare fields, and a quality of life that’s enabled one of the highest homeownership rates in the country.

The average 30-year fixed mortgage rate has declined from 4.3 percent to 3.8 percent recently, still well below its long-term average of around 8.0 percent. One additional rate hike may be in the cards this year, but the Fed is focused on unwinding its large portfolio. Additional inventory is still needed in order to offset declining affordability brought on by higher prices and interest rates.

“Throughout the recovery, the affordable end of the market has been the focus,” said Kath Hammerseng, MAAR President-Elect. “For homes above $250,000, the market is better supplied, less competitive and is still expanding—it’s really the bottom-end of the market that’s feeling the most inventory and therefore sales pressure.”

Questions? Contact David Arbit, MAAR’s Director of Research + Economics | davida@mplsrealtor.com

from Blog – Minneapolis Area Association of Realtors https://www.mplsrealtor.com/blog/slight-cool-down-possible-particularly-under-250000/
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Great Horned Owl #17-0363

Great Horned Owl #17-0363 has been cleared for release by the veterinary team; the owlet will be released at James Madison’s Montpelier in Orange County on Tuesday, October 17 at 6:15 p.m. The release is open to the public; those attending are asked to RSVP to lkegley@wildlifecenter.org. Those planning on attending the release should enter through the main gate on Route 20 [Constitution Highway] and follow signs to the Visitor Center.

from Wildlife Center of Virginia RSS https://www.wildlifecenter.org/critter-corner/patient-updates/great-horned-owl-17-0363
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Bobcat #17-2495

On September 30, a juvenile female bobcat was hit by a vehicle while crossing Route 33 in Rockingham County, Virginia. The bobcat was captured and transported to the Wildlife Center, where Dr. Monica, one of the Center’s veterinary interns, examined the bobcat.

from Wildlife Center of Virginia RSS https://www.wildlifecenter.org/critter-corner/current-patients/bobcat-17-2495
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What Stage of the Cycle are we in?

from The Commercial Real Estate Show – Sponsored by Bull Realty https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o1WOjKbiL6Y
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White-tailed Deer Fawns of 2017 Release

During the past month, the rehabilitation staff ceased daily bottle feeding for the deer fawns and transitioned them to a diet of only browse and fruit. By early October, the fawns were well adjusted to their diet and were old enough to be released back to the wild.

 

from Wildlife Center of Virginia RSS https://www.wildlifecenter.org/critter-corner/patient-updates/white-tailed-deer-fawns-2017-release
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Does it Make Sense to Not Have Positive Leverage?

from The Commercial Real Estate Show – Sponsored by Bull Realty https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xLA9mrP8zYU
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Great Horned Owlets #17-1135 and #17-0885 Release

Great Horned Owlets #17-1135 and 17-0885 both had their pre-release blood work done earlier this week; both received clearance for release from the veterinary team!

On Wednesday, October 11, the owls were picked up by a volunteer transporter and were taken back to the Eastern Shore of Virginia. Prior to their departure, wildlife rehabilitator Brie banded the two owlets, and also sharpened their talons and beaks to help them be effective hunters. After five months of rehabilitation, the staff is happy to send these birds back to the wild!

from Wildlife Center of Virginia RSS https://www.wildlifecenter.org/critter-corner/patient-updates/great-horned-owlets-17-1135-and-17-0885-release
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Black Bear cub #17-1180 Results

A necropsy on Black Bear cub #17-1180, conducted by an outside laboratory, confirmed that the cub had cerebellar hypoplasia, a neurological condition in which the part of the brain that coordinates muscular activity is smaller than usual or not completely developed. This explains the consistent neurologic symptoms the Wildlife Center staff noted. This issue can be congenital or viral; in this bear’s case, results did not indicate which caused the condition. 

from Wildlife Center of Virginia RSS https://www.wildlifecenter.org/critter-corner/patient-updates/black-bear-cub-17-1180-results
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Want or Not Want Off Market Bidders?

from The Commercial Real Estate Show – Sponsored by Bull Realty https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h3fjk3Ac9k0
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